Word Dogs! FAQs


Word Dogs! FAQs

How many words does Word Dogs cover?

Word Dogs encompasses all 220 Dolch sight words:

πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
a
about
after
again
all
always
am
an
and
any
are
around
as
ask
at
ate
away
be
because
been
before
best
better
big
black
blue
both
bring
brown
but
buy
by
call
came
can
carry
clean
cold
come
could
cut
did
do
does
done
don’t
down
draw
drink
eat
eight
every
fall
far
fast
find
first
five
fly
for
found
four
from
full
funny
gave
get
give
go
goes
going
good
got
green
grow
had
has
have
he
help
her
here
him
his
hold
hot
how
hurt
I
if
in
into
is
it
its
jump
just
keep
kind
know
laugh
let
light
like
little
live
long
look
made
make
many
may
me
much
must
my
myself
never
new
no
not
now
of
off
old
on
once
one
only
open
or
our
out
over
own
pick
play
please
pretty
pull
put
ran
read
red
ride
right
round
run
said
saw
say
see
seven
shall
she
show
sing
sit
six
sleep
small
so
some
soon
start
stop
take
tell
ten
thank
that
the
their
them
then
there
these
they
think
this
those
three
to
today
together
too
try
two
under
up
upon
us
use
very
walk
want
warm
was
wash
we
well
went
were
what
when
where
which
white
who
why
will
wish
with
work
would
write
yellow
yes
you
your
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚
πŸ™‚

How long should it take the typical kindergartener to learn their sight words?

Research indicates that the typical early reader must see and say a sight word between 20 and 50 times before he/she is fluent with the word. The learning curve is according to each individual’s potential. The way the subject matter is presented affects the depth, scope and speed of their potential. It is our belief that the typical student should be able to learn all 220 sight words by the end of kindergarten if the words are presented in a meaningful and engaging manner.

How is Word Dogs different than other reading programs?

Each Word Dogs music video enables a child to see and say any given sight word as much as 10 times upon one viewing. Because the videos are entertaining, students can interact with it in multiple ways.

The Guided Reading Big Books reinforce the learning process. A typical learning plan would include:

  • Morning reading session with Big Book and corresponding music video
  • Afternoon reading session with Big Book and corresponding music video
  • Sight Word game

Using this method, students will see a sight word as much as 50 times in just one day. A teacher might find it challenging to keep a student’s attention on a flashcard that many times.

In addition, the Word Dogs program puts each word into context with a story and gives animated pictures to further enhance the meaning of the words. The melody and rhythm provide opportunities for learning through multiple modalities for visual, auditory, kinesthetic and other types of learners. Although each student learns at their own potential, WordDogs presents the information in a way that research indicates works faster and better. Try our free demo and test it for yourself.

Does Word Dogs work for ELL (English Language Learners) / ESL (English Secondary Language) students?

World Dogs can be leveraged as an ELL learning aide because it contains many ELL learning strategies, including:

  • Multiple uses of each word
  • Animated pictures for context clues
  • Use of multiple modalities
  • Variety of media such as books, videos and games

Do you recommend any tips or strategies when using Word Dogs to help my students?

Word Dogs is an excellent learning tool for students and a valuable resource for teachers. Here are some tips for using Word Dogs effectively with your students:

  1. Make everything a game. Choose a sight word of the day and start a hunt for the corresponding bone-shaped flashcard that you have cleverly hidden at the end of the paw print trail (see printable resources on product DVD).
  2. Segue to the corresponding Big Book that gives the words meaning through context clues, pictures and repetition.
  3. Have the students participate with the corresponding music video.
  4. Encourage students to hop or do cross-lateral movements as the words move.
  5. Help them feel successful during the TAG (Test Assessment Guide) at the end of the video by saying they word just before your students do.
  6. Pause the video at the end to check for understanding. Ask students to point to the word you say aloud.
  7. Short bursts work best. Play a video or Big Book with the students only once and then coming back to it later.
  8. Play one of the fun activities or games.
  9. After your students have gone through this routine a few times, have them read the word in print or on the screen. Track results on the progression chart.

How do I access the printable resources on the DVD?

To access the printable resources, simply β€œright click” on your DVD drive to view and open the folder containing the PDF resource files.

What kind of printable resources are on the DVD?

The printable resources include:

  • 240 mini-page flipchart with illustrations that can be placed in a three-ring binder
  • Movement ideas
  • Games/extensions
  • Flashcards
  • Lyric sheets
  • Student assessments
  • Award certificates and more

Will there be other products from Curriculalala?

Yes, register today to become a member and receive product updates and information.

Why shouldn’t my students decode or β€œsound out” the sight words?

Many of these words can’t be sounded out by decoding rules, like the word β€œwas”. If an early reader is sounding out each word in a sentence, the meaning of the sentence is lost. Since sight words represent a very large percentage of the words in a sentence, it makes sense to address fluency through sight-words and then decode the few remaining words. Furthermore, many of the sight words can’t be represented by pictures, for example: if, do, am, for, as, so, be. They are service words which give meaning and direction, e.g. here, there, now, then, on, at, in, over, today. Dolch sight words should be recognized on sight (instantly) for reading to progress smoothly.

Why should we teach sight words?

Sight words form the foundation for successful reading skills. If you can recognize on sight eight of the 10 words in a sentence, you can read that sentence and generally decode the remaining words by context, phonic, or illustrations. Most importantly, you can understand its meaning!